Ba Spanish Meaning Of Essay

Course overview

Practical language study and linguistic exploration

Language is a window to the human mind. On our BA in Spanish and Linguistics, you will learn to understand what you see through it, by combining practical study of Spanish language with the scientific study of what makes language work. 

Spanish

Our focus is on developing effective communication skills. You will be taught mainly in Spanish, in groups of no more than 15 students, and we aim to encourage not only fluency but also the ability to discuss complex ideas in a coherent manner. Modules explore the society and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, in order to equip you with the background knowledge to function as a high-level Spanish communicator. The third year of this four-year programme is a year abroad in a Spanish-speaking country, during which you will gain valuable experience and considerably enhance your language skills.

Beginners welcome!

We offer intensive Spanish ab initio (i.e., from scratch, or with a qualification below A-level) on this programme, as well as study designed for those who have A-level Spanish.

Linguistics

At the same time as acquiring practical Spanish skills, you will study language from a scientific standpoint. The programme offers unparalleled coverage of the field of linguistics, with modules taught by world-leading academics in the core areas of syntax, phonetics and phonology, semantics, and sociolinguistics. and in sub-fields including forensic phonetics, historical linguistics, child language, second language acquisition, and morphology. Our challenging combination of theory and practice is designed to stimulate your critical thinking skills, foster your originality, and enable you to become a uniquely skilled analytical thinker and problem-solver.

A top teaching and research community

We are a leading centre for research in linguistics, and the strength and diversity of our research is reflected in our teaching. We have been rated 2nd in the UK for ‘world-leading’ research (Research Excellence Framework), a world top 100 linguistics department (QS rankings, 2018), and 9th in the UK for linguistics (Times Good University Guide, 2017).

Course content

What you'll study

You will study Spanish and Linguistics side by side throughout the degree, with opportunities to customise your course from the second year onwards—once you've learnt the basics. Your knowledge of Spanish will inform your study of linguistics, and vice versa.

Spanish

  • In the first year, ab initio students follow an intensive fast-track Spanish programme, while post-A-level students dive straight in to modules designed to develop fluency, accuracy and communication expertise.
  • From the second year, you will engage with issues of culture and society in the Spanish-speaking world, addressing questions such as Why is the Spanish Civil War still a difficult topic in Spain?, and What is the relationship between the human rights movement and democratisation in Latin America? You will develop skills in critical analysis of sources and communicate your findings using Spanish in different registers. 
  • Your third year is a year abroad spent in a Spanish-speaking country. We assist you in setting up overseas university study or teaching placements, and offer guidance on all aspects of the year. See our current year abroad pages for more information. 
  • In the final year, you will continue to engage—in Spanish—with issues that shape Spanish-speaking societies. You can choose from a range of advanced Spanish modules designed to consolidate your critical skills through in-depth research and analysis.

Linguistics

  • In the first year, you study three or four core linguistics modules (depending on whether you are taking Spanish ab initio or from A-level).
  • In the second year, you'll apply your core linguistic knowledge to new types of linguistic data, such as child language or non-native language. At the same time, you will gain deeper theoretical knowledge in the core areas that you choose to pursue.
  • In the final year, you can choose freely from a wide range of modules that allow you to become proficient in all aspects of managing small-scale linguistic analysis projects, from identifying the research questions, to communicating the findings. Many final-year linguistics modules offer the opportunity to focus on Spanish language as the topic of research, if you wish.

What modules are offered

Stage one (first year), 5 or 6 modules

Note that there are two routes for the first-year: the A-level route and the Ab initio route.

A-Level route

Ab initio route

Stage two (second year), 6 modules

  • At least two Spanish modules, including Language and Society II 
  • Introduction to language acquisition
  • Your choice of three further modules, including at least one of:
    • Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology
    • Intermediate Syntax
  • Other choices include: Linguistics options (e.g., Intermediate Semantics, Intermediate Language Variation and Change), a Spanish option, an LFA module, or an elective*

Year abroad (third year)

Your year abroad is spent in a Spanish-speaking country, at a university, on a work placement or on an English teaching assistantship.

Stage three (final year), 6 modules

  • At least two Spanish modules, including Language and Society III
  • Up to four linguistics modules
  • Up to two electives*

A wide range of final-year Spanish and linguistics modules is offered, including Translation Methodology and Practice, Phonetics of Spanish, Latinos in the USA, Language as Action, Psycholinguistics, Formal Syntactic Theory, Bilingualism and Neurolinguistics. See our current final-year offerings for a typical full range. (Note that module offerings vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.)

*An elective is a module from another department. All electives are offered subject to departmental approval and timetable availability.

In addition to the above you will also need to complete our online Academic Integrity module. This covers some of the essential skills and knowledge which will help you to study independently and produce work of a high academic standard which is vital for success at York.

This module will:

  • define academic integrity and academic misconduct;
  • explain why and when you should reference source material and other people's work;
  • provide interactive exercises to help you to assess whether you've understood the concepts;
  • provide answers to FAQs and links to useful resources.

Teaching

How you'll be taught

In both Spanish and Linguistics, we aim to equip you to be an effective independent learner. The programme of study includes a variety of modes of teaching and dissemination, designed to allow you to develop the skills and autonomy to direct your own learning.

Spanish

Our focus at York is on effective communication in Spanish. That is why:

  • we teach mainly in small seminars (not more than 12);
  • the medium of classroom interaction is Spanish;
  • we use authentic Spanish materials (e.g., Spanish television, magazines, etc.);
  • we emphasise issues of culture and society, allowing you to develop a high level cultural awareness to underpin your language skills.

Our communicative and culture-oriented approach to teaching, combined with your application and study, will allow you to develop integrity as a skilled user of advanced Spanish.

Linguistics

Linguistics is a new subject for everyone, so the focus in the first year is on learning the tools of linguistic study. We facilitate this through large lectures (some with over 100 students), accompanied by regular back-up sessions in smaller groups (15–20 students), in which you put your new skills into practice.

Second year linguistics modules typically have more interactive classroom activities, such as group presentations or practical sessions, in addition to lectures. Regular seminars provide a forum for discussion of core knowledge and its application beyond the specific classroom topic. Advance preparation for seminar discussion is essential.

In final-year modules, most teaching takes place in smaller groups. Depending on the module, your work may focus on library-based study using primary research papers, lab-based analysis of linguistic corpora, or lectures and seminars in one the advanced areas of specialism of our staff. Students who opt to write a dissertation will receive individual supervision on their dissertation project.

Computer-assisted learning opportunities

All of our modules have associated Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) sites where all crucial materials—reading lists, handouts, discussion boards—are always accessible via the internet. Most first-year modules provide additional self-study practice exercises on the VLE.

We have our own departmental e-Lab, accessible 24-hours a day, for the teaching and study time of our students.

How much study time is expected?

Throughout the degree, you will typically spend 12 hours per teaching week in the classroom (including both Spanish and linguistics). You should expect to devote at least 30 additional hours a week to independent study, which will include completing exercises, reading and digesting assigned papers, researching projects, writing and revising coursework, and preparing for assessments. Twice a year, in the middle of the autumn and spring terms, we have a reading week, which is devoted to independent study. You will receive guidance on your goals for each reading week.

Overall workload

As a guide, students on this course typically spend their time as follows:

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4
Lectures and seminars228 hours192 hours0 hours180 hours
Placement0 hours0 hours1200 hours0 hours

The figures above are based on data from 2016/17.

The rest of your time on the course will be spent on independent study. This may include preparation for lectures and seminars, follow-up work, wider reading, practice completion of assessment tasks, or revision. Everyone learns at a different rate, so the number of hours will vary from person to person. In UK higher education the expectation is that full-time students will spend 1200 hours a year learning.

Assessment

How you'll be assessed

The main assessment types are exams and coursework. Within these two broad types you will encounter many variations customised to the content of each module. Types of coursework range from short sets of exercises, to 5,000-word essays, to oral presentations, to group projects in which you work in a team to research and present a topic. You will present work for language modules in the target language (French, German or Spanish). In most modules, the final mark is made up of the marks from more than one type of assessment.

What about practice or 'mock' assessments?

At York, assessments that count towards your final mark are called 'summative' assessments, but all modules also include 'formative' work — work that will help you to practice or develop skills for the summative assessment. Some modules (particularly in the first year) include a formative exam midway through the year. Other modules include formative exercises, a formative essay, or some opportunity to get feedback on the development and progress of a piece of summative work.

What kind of feedback will I get?

Instructors provide feedback in a variety of forms, according to the needs of the specific module. It may consist of written feedback on work that you have handed in, in-class discussion of common problems on a particular assignment, model answers, one-on-one discussion of research projects, or online responses to questions posted on the module discussion board.

Is the year abroad assessed?

Yes, in the sense that you must satisfactorily complete the following in order to graduate with a degree that has 'with a year abroad' in the title:

  • two essays in the target language submitted to York during the year;
  • fulfillment of year abroad obligations (attending courses and completing all the local assessments if you're at university; or carrying out your teaching duties if you're on a teaching assistantship).

However, your marks on the year abroad assessments do not contribute towards your overall degree mark.

Adjustments for students with disabilities

We can make reasonable adjustments to assessment procedures for students with disabilities. However, please note that, for students with dyslexia, it is not possible to make adjustments in the marking of work written in a closed language exam (French, German, Italian or Spanish). This is because accurate spelling is one of the assessment objectives in language exams. Note, though, that closed exams make up only a proportion of the assessment types used for languages; other assessment types such as coursework and oral presentations are also used. Students with dyslexia could apply for extra time in closed exams, if this would be of assistance. See the University's disability support pages for further details relating to all disabilities.

Percentage of the course typically assessed by coursework and exams

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4
Written exams68%64%0%49%
Coursework27%28%100%34%
Practical exams5%8%0%17%

The figures above are based on data from 2016/17.

Careers

Careers and employability

Effective communication, critical thinking and project management skills are central to most careers. The study of language and linguistics at York equips you with these skills and others, which translate readily into any work context.

Our graduates

Our language graduates have an excellent record of pursuing fulfilling paths after graduation.

Apart from their language skills and their knowledge of linguistics, our alumni have the confidence that comes from successfully completing a demanding course and participating fully in university life.

Career paths

There are specialist careers that lead directly from a language and linguistics degree, after additional postgraduate training, including:

  • translation and interpreting
  • teaching (primary and secondary)
  • clinical linguistics (Speech and Language Therapy)
  • academic research and higher/further education
  • forensic linguistics (Forensic Speech Science)

Our graduates are not limited to these specialist paths, however.  Ongoing contact with our alumni well after graduation shows that they are equipped to pursue rewarding careers across a broad range of professional fields, including:

  • marketing and communications
  • publishing
  • broadcasting and journalism
  • local government and public service
  • finance and accountancy
  • and many more ... 

Find out more about how we can help make you more employable

Applying

How to apply

All applications must be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

Prospective applicants should also read through the university's Undergraduate Prospectus. You can choose to view the prospectus online, download a PDF copy, or request a printed version.

Visit our department

We run a series of Open Days and Visit Days throughout the year, which will provide you with an opportunity to visit the University and the Department and talk to staff about the courses and your interests. We also have an undergraduate admissions tutor who is happy to answer any questions you may have.

Applicants

Our French, German, Italian and Spanish programmes are designed to develop fluency in the languages. For this reason we do not normally offer places to native or near-native speakers of French, German, Italian or Spanish who wish to study their own language.

Applying for the ab initio route in Spanish or German

Qualifications

GCSE or AS-level Spanish or German may be appropriate qualifications for entry onto the ab initio Spanish or German programmes. However, even if you do not have one of these qualifications, but you can demonstrate an aptitude for languages through other experience (e.g., successful study of a different foreign language), you may be eligible for this programme.

Language placement interviews

Some students who do not have an A-level in one of the languages they wish to study may nonetheless already have A-level-standard knowledge of the language (e.g., a student who took GCSE and then spent time in a country where the target language is spoken, before university). At the time of application, we will conduct a placement interview and task, to determine which route would be most appropriate for students who do not have an A-level in a language they wish to study.

International students

We welcome applications from international applicants, who wish to join the growing body of international students in our Department.

Entry requirements

A levels

Our typical offer is AAB, but some ABB offers will be made (see our typical offers page). We do not require any specific subject choices at A Level, and include all subjects in our standard offer.

International Baccalaureate

Scottish Highers / Advanced Highers

Irish Leaving Certificate

BTEC

BTEC National Diploma or QCF BTEC Extended Diploma with DDD.

European Baccalaureate

Other qualifications

Pre-U: D3,D3,M2

Access to HE: Obtain Access to HE Diploma with 36 credits at Distinction and 9 credits at Merit or higher


Other qualifications are accepted by the University, please contact Undergraduate Admissions.

English Language Requirements

  • IELTS: 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in all units
  • Pearson PTE Academic: 61 overall with 51 in all parts
  • Cambridge Advanced English (CAE): grade A
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): grade C
  • GCSE/O level English Language (as a first language): grade C

See also the University's information page for English language requirements.

Other options for this subject

We also offer Spanish on a variety of other courses:

And we offer linguistics on other degree courses, too:

The BA in Linguistics course allows you to try a completely new language in your first year, from scratch, from the range of languages offered by Languages for All.

Courses

Modrn & Clscl Lang & Lit

CI 161. Mth Mtl F L

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Spanish

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - German

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - French

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Span

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 20 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Germ

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 20 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Fren

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 20 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FL 10T. Topics in Foreign Language

Beginning or intermediate speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in a selected language.

Units: 1-4

FL 131. Trends in Foreign Language Teaching

Current trends and issues in foreign language teaching. Evaluation of recent teaching materials. May include on-campus practice in teaching beginning languages.

Units: 3

FL 170. Community Service

Directed fieldwork in a project which uses language skills developed through previous study of a foreign language. Projects may include working with public school foreign language teachers and students, interpreting/ translating for public/ private service agencies, or other approved projects. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-3

FL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FREN 1A. Elementary French

Beginning course in conversational and written French. Not open to students with two or more years of high school French credit.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FREN 1B. Elementary French

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; FREN 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Second semester course in conversational and written French. Not open to those with three or more years of high school French credit. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

FREN 2A. French for Communication

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; FREN 1B or equivalent recommended. Second year course that emphasizes speaking and reading, and a review of basic French grammar. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

FREN 2B. French for Communication

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; FREN 2A or equivalent recommended. Second year course that emphasizes speaking and reading skills. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

FREN 4. Reading and Writing

FREN 2B or equivalent recommended. Opportunity to increase reading and writing skills in preparation for upper-division coursework in French.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FREN 5. Conversation

FREN 2A or equivalent recommended. May be taken concurrently with FREN 2A or FREN 4. Development of listening and speaking skills. Exclusive use of French in an informal class atmosphere. Conversations on assigned topics, extemporaneous discussions.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FREN 103. Advanced Grammar and Composition

Two semesters of Intermediate French recommended. To be taken twice for the major. Written assignments in French on varied topics with emphasis on composition. Written exercises in French on specific points of grammar. (Fall semester)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FREN 109. French Literature, Culture, and Society from the Middle Ages to Today

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Two semesters of intermediate French recommended. Intellectual, cultural and social background of major literary movements and representative authors from the earliest period to the present. Selected readings. Taught in French. (Fall semester) G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

FREN 110. French Theater

FREN 109 recommended. Drama in France from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on the 17th and 20th centuries. Reading and discussion of representative works.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FREN 111. The French Novel

FREN 109 recommended. The novel as a reflection of French society. Analysis of major works from various periods.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FREN 112. French Prose: Essay and Short Story

FREN 109 recommended. Analysis of prose works by such authors as Montaigne, Voltaire, Maupassant, Camus, Sartre.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FREN 113. French Poetry

FREN 109 recommended. Introductory course in poetry as a genre; principles of French versification. Students will be exposed to major contributions of the French in poetry. Thematic and/or chronological presentations (movements, "isms").

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FREN 120T. Topics in French Civilization

FREN 103 recommended or permission of instructor. Possible topics: French contributions to Western Civilization (art, music, architecture, history, science). Special emphasis on contemporary France. The history of Anglo-French and Franco-American relations. Linguistic, cultural, intellectual, political, commercial, and diplomatic similarities and differences explored. Taught in French.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FREN 132. French Phonology and Structural Analysis

Completion of one semester of FREN 103 recommended. As a progression toward mastery, an investigation of the French language as a functioning code of verbal communication. Relationships of oral/written aspects and contrasts with American English. Intensive drill on individual pronunciation problems.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FREN 149. Voices of Africa

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Study of representative works by such writers as Achebe, Senghor, and Mphahlele which reveal the attitudes of modern Africans toward their land, their traditions, and their encounter with the 20th century world. Course taught in English. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

FREN 150. Advanced Conversation

Two semesters of Intermediate French recommended. Intensive practice in oral expression in French. Emphasis on current affairs in France.

Units: 3

FREN 160T. Selected Topics in French Studies

FREN 103 recommended or permission of instructor. Topics chosen from French literature (genre, themes, movements), from French linguistics (History of the Language; Contrastive Analysis: English/French), or French Culture and Civilization.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FREN 160T. Voices of French-Speaking Southeast Asia

This course will also explore the concept of Francophonie and its meaning among the French-speakers in these countries and other regions of the world where peoples from French-speaking Southeast Asia had to relocate in an often forced Diaspora. These peoples maintain two ties: one to their countries of origin and another to France. The course also covers their attitudes toward the French-language and France, their own societies, their cultures, their countries, and their encounters with the 21st century.

Units: 3

FREN 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FREN 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

GERM 1A. Elementary German

Beginning course. Imparts basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing abilities in German as well as introduces the cultures of Germany, Switzerland and Austria. Not open to students with two or more years of high school German credit.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GERM 1B. Elementary German

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; GERM 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Second semester course. Develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing abilities; broadens knowledge of German, Swiss and Austrian cultures. Not open to those with three or more years of high school German. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: C2

GERM 2A. Intermediate German

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; GERM 1B recommended or permission of instructor. Third semester course. Builds reading, conversational, and writing facilities in German; develops linguistic and cultural mastering of varied, increasingly complex situations. General review of grammar syntax; cultural topics. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: C2

GERM 2B. Intermediate German

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; GERM 2A recommended or permission of instructor. Fourth semester course. Builds further reading, conversational, and writing facilities in German; develops general linguistic and cultural competence. General review of grammar and syntax; cultural topics. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: C2

GERM 8T. Selected Topics in German

GERM 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Language experience outside classroom stressed in oral topics. Problem vocabulary and grammar topics. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 2 units

GERM 50. Conversation

GERM 2B or concurrently recommended or permission of instructor. Conversation on prepared topics, brief talks by students, short scenes from plays, sharpening of listening skills and oral expression. Preparation for "survival" in German speaking countries. (Spring semester)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GERM 101. Composition

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. Development of written expression through intensive practice, vocabulary building, grammar and syntax review, cooperative work on improving composition, analysis of varying styles. May be taken twice. (Fall semester)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall

GERM 103T. German Culture and Civilization

Studies in principal aspects of German (also Austrian and Swiss) history, thought, customs, institutions, film, arts, music, folklore, contemporary life; influence on Western civilization. Taught in English.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

GERM 112. German Literature to 1750

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. In-depth studies of German literature prior to 1750: Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation, Baroque, Enlighten ment; including such authors as Wolfram, Walther von der Vogelweide, Luther, Grim melshausen. Critical analysis of texts, lecture, discussion, student reports.

Units: 3

GERM 114. German Literature through the Classical Age

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. From the beginnings to Goethe's death in 1832, concentrating on the Classical Age (Lessing, Schiller, Goethe). Critical analysis of texts, lecture, discussion, student reports.

Units: 3

GERM 116. Nineteenth Century Literature

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. Investigates major 19th century authors such as Brentano, Tieck, Hoffmann, Buchner, Stifter, Keller, Raabe, Fontane. Critical analysis of texts, lecture, discussion, student reports.

Units: 3

GERM 118A. Modern Literature: 1890-1945

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. Investigates Classical Modernity (1890-World War II), including such authors as Kafka, Rilke, Mann, Brecht, Musil. Critical analysis of texts, lecture, discussion, student reports.

Units: 3

GERM 118B. Contemporary Literature: 1945-Present

GERM 2B recommended or permission of instructor. Investigates the Postmodern Age (World War II to the present), including such author as Grass, Boll, Frisch, Handke, Bernhard, Wolf. Critical analysis of texts, lecture, discussion, student reports.

Units: 3

GERM 150. Advanced Conversation

GERM 2B or concurrently recommended or permission of instructor. Intensive practice in advanced oral German to cultivate ease within a number of speech situations. Emphasis on current affairs in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. (Spring semester)

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

GERM 160T. Topics in German Studies

Intensive analysis, discussion, and evaluation of significant facets of German life through the study of specific movements, literary problems, themes, films, cultural artifacts, music, institutions, epochs, folklore, and regions.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units

GERM 160T. Movies go to War: Post WWII German Cinema

This course offers a comprehensive analysis of historical and visual representations of WWll and the Holocaust in Hollywood Cinema and Post-Unification (1990-present) German films. This interdisciplinary study of German culture and mediated memory after the Third Reich (1933-45) aims to foster a sense of appreciation for how films narrate history and focuses on the representation of Hitler and Nazi Germany. Themes and concepts to be analyzed include: the questions regarding war as a topic of comedy, victim-perpetrator dichotomies, stereotypes and presuppositions about Nazi Germany, as well as the figure of the war hero.

Units: 3

GERM 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

GERM 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Indpendent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

GRK 1A. Elementary Greek

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. An introduction to the fundamentals of Classical and New Testament Greek, with practice in reading and writing the Greek language. Background study: Greek culture and its relevancy to the modern world. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: C2

GRK 1B. Elementary Greek

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2, GRK 1A or permission of instructor. Second semester course in Classical and New Testament Greek; completion of the fundamentals of Greek grammar. Emphasis on translation practice and composition skills. Background study: Greek culture and its relevancy to the modern world. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: C2

GRK 10. The Rise of Rationalism: 5th C. Athens

The origins of argumentation, logic, rhetoric, inductive thinking, and the role of literature in fifth-century Athens, as reflected in selections from Plato, Thucydides, Euripides, and the orators. Discussions and lectures. Conducted in English.

Units: 3

GRK 131T. Greek Literature

Prerequisite: GRK 1B. Concentration on a major Classical Greek poet or prose author. Translation and discussion. Research reports on literary, historical, and textual problems.

Units: 3

GRK 131T. Plato's Republic

Plato's magnum opus, The Republic, stands at the dawn of political philosophy and remains the unchallenged starting point for inquiry into ethics, metaphysics and epistemology in the western philosophical tradition. It is precisely because of the profundity and scope of Plato's examination of what can be regarded as political - the public, the self, sex, morality, metaphysics, education - that The Republic is widely read, perhaps more so than any other single work. At first blush, it is a work about the idea of justice, but The Republic is like an onion which upon pealing it reveals little except the experience of exploration of the thing itself, and because it is a dialogue and not a treatise, it reveals no concrete answers. Rather it poses questions about who and what we are as individuals. In this course we read sections from Plato's Republic with a focus on Book 1. Students will translate from the original Greek, paying special attention to the morphology and syntax of Plato's language. Some of the questions we'll ponder: do nice guys finish last? - and what is the nature of reality? Such queries will leas us to consider a host of contemporary issues to include, inter alia, cultural relativism, social contract theory, feminism, censorship, and moral excellence.

Units: 3

GRK 131T. Bacchae

Perhaps the most darkly psychological of extant Greek tragedies, Euripides' Bacchae explores the dual essences of human nature: the rational, logical and civilized side, versus the irrational, sensual, spiritual, spontaneous and creative. Euripides warns that we humans reject the divine at our peril. The course explores these fundamentals of the human condition through close analysis of the original Greek, which gives meaning to the notion of the delicate balance that was the Greek genius.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

GRK 131T. Josephus

This upper division course will examine the literature of Flavius Josephus. The goal of this course is for students to learn how the Attic Greek language of the fifth and fourth centuries becomes emulated as a literary language under the Roman Empire.

Units: 3

GRK 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ITAL 1A. Elementary Italian

Beginning course in conversational and written Italian with special emphasis on Italian culture (literature, music, philosophy and lifestyle).. Not open to those with two or more years of high school Italian credit.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ITAL 1B. Elementary Italian

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; ITAL 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Second semester course in conversational and written Italian. Not open to those with three or more years of high school Italian credit. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ITAL 2A. Intermediate Italian

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; ITAL 1B recommended or permission of instructor. Review of grammar and syntax; composition; oral practice, reading of short stories and plays. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ITAL 2B. Intermediate Italian

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; ITAL 2A recommended or permission of instructor. Oral and written composition; reading of short stories, novels, biographies. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

ITAL 5. Conversation

ITAL 1B recommended. May be taken concurrently with ITAL 2A or ITAL 2B. Development of listening skills and oral fluency through discussion, vocabulary exercises, and conversations on assigned topics.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

ITAL 160T. Selected Topics in Italian Studies

Topics chosen from Italian literature (genre, themes, movements, particular authors), from Italian culture or civilization, or from Italian cinema.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

ITAL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

LATIN 1A. Elementary Latin

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. An introduction to the fundamentals of the Latin language, grammar, and its practical relation to Romance languages and English. Background study: Roman culture and its relevance to the modern world. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

LATIN 1B. Elementary Latin

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation A2, LATIN 1A or permission of instructor. Second semester course in Latin; completion of the fundamentals of Latin grammar. Emphasis on translation practice and composition skills. Background study: Roman culture and its relevance to modern world. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

LATIN 131T. Latin Literature

Prerequisite: LATIN 1B. Concentration on a major Latin poet or prose author. Translation and discussion. Research reports on literary, historical, and textual problems.

Units: 3

LATIN 131T. Boethius-Consolation of Philosophy

In this course we will read selections from The Consolation of Philosophy, written by Anicius Severinus Boethius (c.480-c.525 CE). This work, written in prison while the author awaited execution by Theodoric, ruler of Rome, was the most popular and influential philosophical work from the sixth to the eighteenth centuries. It was translated into English by King Alfred, Chaucer, and Queen Elizabeth I. This work has long been recognized as one of the most important intermediaries between ancient philosophy and the Latin Middle Ages, and reading the work in the original Latin will allow students to study the early changes taking place in the language at that time. Students will demonstrate their reading skills through weekly translation assignments, a midterm and a final exam. Each student will also be required to present on a topic related to the treatise?s background, influence, and reception, exploring its literary life beyond antiquity.

Units: 3

LATIN 131T. Apuleius

In this course we will read selections from Apuleius' Metamorphoses. Dubbed The Golden Ass by St. Augustine, this so-called "novel" is a classic of ancient literature, whose influence spans from late antiquity to our modern day. A philosophical allegory, a religious pilgrimage, a comic collection of bawdy romances and adventurous tales, this oft-overlooked Latin story provides a forum not only for translating Latin, but it will allow us to explore questions concerning genre and readership, and to examine the cultural milieu of Roman North Africa in the second century. Students will demonstrate their reading skills through weekly translation assignments, a midterm and a final exam. Each student will also be required to present on a topic related to the novel's background, influence, and reception, exploring its life beyond antiquity in literature, art, and film.

Units: 3

LATIN 131T. Latin Prose Survey

This upper-division course will consist of the works of a selection of readings from Livy, Caesar, and Cicero, with particular emphasis on advanced syntactical constructions, particularly indirect discourse.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

LATIN 132. Classical Mythology

Greco-Roman myths, emphasis on their impact on the fine arts and literatures of the Western World. Illustrated lectures. Taught in English.

Units: 3

LATIN 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

PORT 1A. Elementary Portuguese

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Beginning course in conversational and written Portuguese, including Luso-Brazilian cultural traditions (literature, music, philosophy and lifestyle). Not open to those with two or more years of high school Portuguese credit.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall
GE Area: C2

PORT 1B. Elementary Portuguese

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; PORT 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Second semester course in conversational and written Portuguese. Not open to those with three or more years of high school Portuguese credit. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: C2

PORT 2A. Intermediate Portuguese

PORT 1B recommended or permission of instructor. Intermediate course emphasizing speaking, listening, reading longer texts, writing compositions, grammar, and Luso-Braizilian culture.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

PORT 2B. Intermediate Portuguese

PORT 2A recommended or permission of instructor. Continuation of PORT 2A emphasizing speaking, listening, grammar, reading longer literature, writing compositions, and Luso-Brazilian culture.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SPAN 1A. Elementary Spanish

Beginning course in conversational and writtten Spanish. Emphasis on reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 1B. Elementary Spanish

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; SPAN 1A recommended or permission of instructor. Second semester course in conversational and written Spanish. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 2A. Spanish for Communication

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Second year course that emphasizes speaking and reading skills. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 2B. Spanish for Communication

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Second year course the emphasizes speaking and reading skills. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 3. Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2; SPAN 2A or SPAN 2B recommended. Opportunity to increase reading and writing skills in preperation for upper-division coursework in Spanish. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 4A. Spanish for the Bilingual Student

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. For the native speaker of Spanish who has intensive life experience using the Spanish language. Grammar is stressed, but speaking, reading, and writing skills are also further developed. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 4B. Spanish for the Bilingual Student

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Recommended: SPAN 3 or permission of instructor. For students from a bilingual background who have previous formal study of Spanish. Emphasis on productive language skills, grammar, advanced reading comprehension, and culture using peninsular and Latin American texts. G.E. Breadth C2.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: C2

SPAN 5. Spanish for Conversation

SPAN 2A or SPAN 2B recommended. Emphasis on spoken Spanish; development of oral fluency through class discussion, conversation games, and vocabulary exercises.

Units: 3

SPAN 8T. Fundamental Skills in Spanish

Instruction in fundamental problems in writing and word usage, such as accentuation, spelling, and vocabulary. Intended primarily for students who need more work in specific areas of writing and speaking. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 4 units

SPAN 10. Spanish in Context

Two years of high school Spanish, SPAN 1B recommended or permission of instructor. Intended for those who are enrolled in our summer study abroad program. Emphasizes speaking, reading, and cultural interaction with members of the community. (Summer only)

Units: 3-6
Course Typically Offered: Summer

SPAN 110T. Practical Spanish for Professionals

Applicable for minor. Preparation of professionals and paraprofessionals in California Spanish to work with the Spanish speaking in the following fields: health, education, social work, business, law, agriculture, and psychology.

Units: 3

SPAN 110T. The 21st Century Classroom

Students will engage with web-based tools and apps through hands-on experiences and cooperative learning. The objective sis to apply knowledge and skills to enhance current curriculum with technology-supported learning strategies. Students will learn to employ technology thoughtfully and strategically in order to best enhance learners communicative and global competence.

Units: 3

SPAN 112. Reader's Theater in Spanish

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Dramatic readings of prose and poetry selections performed by students in front of the class. Discussion focuses on a critical reading of the text and preparation of the performance. Public presentations and recordings optional.

Units: 3

SPAN 113. Structure of Spanish

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. An introductory descriptive survey of the structure of standard Spanish: sounds, spelling, word formation, and grammar.

Units: 3

SPAN 114. Essentials of Medical Interpreting

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Introduction to the profession of medical interpreting from English into Spanish and vice versa. Topics include medical terminology, the role of the interpreter, code of ethics, standards of practice, interpreting laws, and multicultural interactions.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 115. Basic Principles of Translation

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Specific problems of Spanish to English and English to Spanish translation, with emphasis on idiomatic expressions. Some attention to specialized vocabulary. Use of bilingual dictionaries.

Units: 3

SPAN 116. Essentials of Legal Interpreting

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Introduction to the profession of legal interpreting from English into Spanish and vice versa. Topics include legal terminology, the role of the interpreter, code of ethics, standards of practice, interpreting laws, and multicultural interactions.

Units: 3

SPAN 117. Advanced Conversation and Reading

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Reading and discussion of current periodicals, newspapers, and magazines that reflect the cultural patterns of the Spanish-speaking countries.

Units: 3

SPAN 119. Advanced Grammar

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Special emphasis on grammar review and development of writing skills. Analysis of grammatical constructions.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 121A. Composition A

SPAN 119 highly recommended. Refinement of writing skills through vocabulary development, spelling exercises, and composition. Special emphasis on problems created by differences between the spoken and written language.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 121B. Composition B

Prerequisite: SPAN 121A. Greater refinement of writing skills necessary for SPAN 140 and further upper-division courses in Hispanic literature. Special emphasis on anlyzing a literary text by written means.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 124. Oral and Written Expression

SPAN 2B, SPAN 3, SPAN 4B, or SPAN 10 recommended. Systematic analysis of students'ability to express themselves, both orally and in writing. Development of vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammatical structures. (Summer only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Summer

SPAN 125. Hispanic Cultural Productions (taught in Spanish)

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Recommended: SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B. Interdisciplinary approach to global examination of cultural productions of Spain and Latin America through readings, lectures, films, and other media. This course is taught in Spanish. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

SPAN 129. Mexican Culture (taught in Spanish)

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area C. Recommended: SPAN 2B, or SPAN 3, or SPAN 4B. Interdisciplinary approach to Mexican culture. Study of geography, history, politics, the arts, aspects of daily life, and cultural patterns by means of reading assignments, lectures by the instructor and invited guests, films and other media. This course is taught in Spanish. G.E. Integration IC.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: IC

SPAN 130. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

SPAN 119 recommended or permission of instructor. Basic principles of Spanish linguistics, including aspects of syntax, morphology, phonetics, dialectology, and historical linguistics.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

SPAN 134. Spanish in Bilingual Schools

Prerequisites: SPAN 119 and SPAN 121A recommended or permission of instructor. Emphasis on Spanish language development for bilingual teachers at the elementary level. Presentation of specialized vocabulary in teaching elementary courses. Development and evaluation of bilingual teaching materials in Spanish. (Formerly SPAN 104)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 137. Applied Spanish Linguistics

SPAN 130 recommended or permission of instructor. Analysis of Spanish with emphasis on areas of phonetics, pronunciation, and grammar which cause the greatest problems in learning and teaching the language. Readings and practice in the development of instructional strategies and materials.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SPAN 139. Spanish of the Southwest

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Research on dialect differences in California and the Southwest, including the linguistic, social, and cultural determinants. Emphasis on the Spanish of the San Joaquin Valley.

Units: 3

SPAN 140. Introduction to Literary Analysis

Required: SPAN 119, SPAN 121B, or permission of instructor. Readings and appreciation of Hispanic literature to familiarize the student with fiction and poetry as art forms.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 142. Introduction to Spanish Literature

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Selected readings from those literary works which have fundamentally affected the development of Spanish civilization, from El Cid to Lorca. Provides a historical framework for the study of Spanish literature.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 143. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature

SPAN 3 or SPAN 4B recommended. Selected readings from those literary works which have fundamentally affected the development of Spanish American civilization, from Hernan Cortes to Octavio Paz. Provides an historical framework for the study of Spanish American literature.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 145. Mexican Literature

SPAN 140 or permission of instructor. Study of the works of such major Mexican literary figures as Sor Juana, Gutierrez Najera, Azuela, and Fuentes.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

SPAN 147. Twentieth Century Spanish-American Literature

SPAN 140 or permission of instructor. Intensive study of selected Spanish-American works including writings of Azuela, Fuentes, Carpenter, Vargas Llosa; outstanding poets such as Neruda, Vallejo, and Paz.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SPAN 148T. Major Themes in Hispanic Literature

SPAN 140 or permission of instructor. Reading and in-depth analysis of the works of major Hispanic authors and/or themes.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SPAN 148T. Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Literature

This course will provide students with an introduction to the contributions of black writers to Hispanic Caribbean literature, and the impact of the racial issue to a national cultural discourse in the different regions that constitute the Caribbean. We will discuss issues such as miscegenation, slavery and race, the history of relationships with Spain and the United States, and racial/ethnic tensions during foundational periods in the countries of the Caribbean. The syllabus will also include texts from regions of the Caribbean in South America, such as Colombia.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SPAN 149. The Golden Age

SPAN 140 or permission of instructor. A study of Spanish Renaissance Man and his environment. His sociopolitical, esthetic, and literary ideas are studied through readings in Garcilaso, San Juan de la Cruz, and other authors.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SPAN 150. Twentieth Century Spanish Literature

SPAN 140 or permission of instructor. A study of Spanish Existential Man. His sociopolitical, esthetic, and literary ideas are studied through readings in Unamuno, Ortega y Gassett, Lorca, Jose Hierro, and other authors.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

SPAN 165. Modernismo - 1950

Prerequisite: SPAN 140, SPAN 142, & SPAN 143, or permission of instructor. In-depth study of the authors from Modernismo and Vanguardia: Dario, Machado, Vallejo, Huidobro, Lorca, Neruda, Paz, and Bombal. Introduction to the ideas of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

SPAN 170. Senior Seminar in Spanish Studies

Senior standing, 20 upper-division units of Spanish coursework recommended, SPAN 140 required, or permission of instructor. Culminating experience in the major that includes summative assessment of language, linguistic, cultural, and literary proficiency. Readings and research projects. Addresses individual needs of graduating majors. (Spring semester)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

SPAN 201. Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language

Strategies for implementing Spanish curriculum at post-secondary level. Study of instructional techniques, procedures, resources, and methods of assessing student performance in post-secondary settings. Practical application of second language acquisition research.

Units: 3

SPAN 202. Introduction to Literary Theory

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Introduction to the study of theory, from Plato to Derrida to Post-Colonialism, as it relates to the study of Hispanic literature.

Units: 3

SPAN 203. Applied Literary Theory

Prerequisite: SPAN 202. Theory and practice of literary analysis. Application of research, bibliographical and critical methods to literary texts.

Units: 3

SPAN 204. Spanish Syntax

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. An analysis of the grammatical structures of the Spanish language. Includes contrastive analysis of Spanish and English syntax.

Units: 3

SPAN 205. History of the Spanish Language

Phonological, morphosyntactic, lexical and semantic development of the Spanish language, from the Pre-Roman period to Modern Spanish.

Units: 3

SPAN 210. Spanish American Short Story

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Study of the short story as an art form in Latin America and analysis of short stories of such writers as Quiroga, Arreola, Rulfo, Bombal, Borges and Cortazar.

Units: 3

SPAN 214. Generation of '98

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Advanced analysis of the literature of Spain written at the time of the final collapse of Spain's empire. Includes works by Azorin, Baroja, Unamuno, Valle-Inclan, Machado, Ortega, and Jimenez.

Units: 3

SPAN 215. Hispanic Women Writers

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and close written analysis of poetry, novels, theater and essays written by Hispanic women from 1535 to present.

Units: 3

SPAN 216. Masterpieces of Hispanic Theater

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and close written analysis of peninsular and Spanish American theater masterpieces, historical milieu and cultural context.

Units: 3

SPAN 218T. Topics in Hispanic Literary Studies

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Hispanic literary topics such as Hispanic Realism, Novel and Cinema, Violence in Hispanic Literature, Novel of Dictatorship, Novel of the Indian in Latin America.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SPAN 219T. Top Creat Writ

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Topics in advanced creative writing in Spanish including poetry, fiction and/or non-fiction.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

SPAN 222. Cervantes

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. In-depth study of Don Quixote and selected Novelas ejemplares. Includes discussion of works, lectures, and written research.

Units: 3

SPAN 224. Major Hispanic Novelists

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Research and in-depth study of the novels of major Hispanic novelists.

Units: 3

SPAN 225. Modernismo - 1950

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Research and in-depth study of the literature from Modernismo through 1950. Discussion and written analysis of the major authors from the period.

Units: 3

SPAN 226. Major Hispanic Poets

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Research and in-depth study of the poetry of major Hispanic poets. Discussion and written analysis of the poetry on one of the following poets: Machado, Lorca, Dario, Neruda.

Units: 3

SPAN 227. Novel of Formation

Analysis of the Latin American novel of formation. Discussion of issues such as the formation of an individual's sense of gender, race, and class, ane the role of travel, memory, orality, and writing in the socialization of youth.

Units: 3

SPAN 230. History of Spanish

The linguistic development of the Spanish language from Latin to the present day including the sound system, word formation and etymology, and grammar, within a social and cultural context.

Units: 3

SPAN 245. Mexican Literature

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and analysis of representative works of Mexican literature from the Precolombian Period through the 1980s. Includes study of major cultural and artistic movements in literature, the visual arts and film.

Units: 3

SPAN 247. The Spanish American "Boom"

In-depth study of the Spanish-American "new novel" that emerged in the 1960s. Analysis of factors leading to this "boom" and impact of this new narrative style on subsequent writers in Latin America and on a broader scale.

Units: 3

SPAN 249. Golden Age

Advanced analysis of prose narratives, poems, and theatrical works from Spain's Renaissance and Baroque periods in their historical and cultural contexts.

Units: 3

SPAN 250. Spanish Post-War Literature

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and analysis of representative works of Spanish literature from 1939 through the 1980s. Examines literary production during the Francoist Dictatorship and the transition to a democratic government.

Units: 3

SPAN 255. Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and analysis of representative works of Spanish literature from the Romantic, Realist, and Naturalist Movement.

Units: 3

SPAN 257. Spanish American Testimonio

Analysis of Spanish American Testimonio genre through representative texts. Discussion of aesthetic, etical, and ideological issues related to the production and diffusion of these texts, such as authority/authorship, literature/anthropology, writing/orality, memory, political engagement, manipulation, and resistance.

Units: 3

SPAN 259. The Poetics of Caribbeanness

Prerequisites: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Analysis of literary and artistic movements in the Spanish Caribbean, from the colonial times to the present, through representative works, emphasizing how the interactions of race, gender, and ethnicity affect the construction of individual and national identities.

Units: 3

SPAN 267. Early 20th Century Spanish Literature

Prerequisite: Spanish major or permission of instructor. Discussion and analysis of represnetative works of Spanish literature from Modernismo, the Generation of 1914, and the Generation of 1927.

Units: 3

SPAN 270. Research Methods

Training in the search for, proper selection of, and proper use of secondary sources in support of a research paper's thesis that participates in currently scholarly debates related to Hispanic literature of all time periods.

Units: 3

SPAN 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

SPAN 298. Project

See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Writing and/or editing materials suitable for school programs from elementary through high school level, such as children's literature, original poetry, testing devices, and translations. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3-6

SPAN 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project SPAN 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

SPAN 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the completion of the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3-6

SPAN 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

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