Argument Essay Example Outlines

In an argumentative essay, you want to convince someone to agree with your idea or opinion, using research-based evidence.

Writing an argumentative essay is a skill that anyone in school needs to know, though it can be useful outside of the classroom, as well. With today's Common Core standards, learning to write an essay that intelligently proves your point is an essential part of your education.

You will need to select solid argumentative essay topics that you can work with, create an argumentative essay outline and write, revise, and polish before you turn the argumentative essay in. It’s worth checking out an argumentative essay sample or two, just so you have a good idea of how the whole thing works. You can learn a lot from what other people have already done.

Choosing Argumentative Essay Ideas

As you look at argumentative essay examples, you’ll notice that there is a specific argumentative essay structure that is followed. It’s easiest to work with this structure if you choose easy argumentative essay topics.

Good argumentative essay topics are interesting and relatively easy to defend. They should fit into your argumentative essay outline fairly easily and will be something you can write on without doing ridiculous amounts of research. You don’t necessarily need to know everything about the topic, but having some base knowledge will help you as you do your research and write the essay.

Ideally, you’ll select interesting argumentative essay topics to work with, which will keep your writing fresh and on point. It’s difficult to write on a topic you don’t enjoy, so selecting one that you can really get into will show in your work.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay

It’s helpful to look at a good argumentative essay example to get some ideas before you begin. This section will show you how to write an argumentative essay that will wow your teachers.

Before you even get started on the actual essay, take some time to create an argumentative essay outline. This will help you follow proper argumentative essay structure and can be useful for ensuring that your work stays on track and makes sense. An outline is an essential part of any essay writing process.

If you find it difficult to create your own outline, an argumentative essay template may come in handy for structuring the essay. A template will include everything you need to get started, including the format, so you just need to fill in the blanks with your own information.

How to Start an Argumentative Essay

The argumentative essay introduction is where you present your topic and your thesis. It should include a hook in the first few sentences. A hook will grab the reader's attention and keep them reading.

Once you've laid the basis of the argumentative essay topic out for the reader, give them a bit of background information to clarify things.

What is the issue you're addressing? Why should anyone care? Where is the issue prevalent? What is your opinion on the topic and why do you feel that way? The answer to this final question will be your thesis, or what you will try to convince the reader of throughout your essay.

Your topic should be something you know is debatable and this can be mentioned in the intro. The first paragraph, according to good argumentative essay format, should include your main point or thesis statement.

As you state your thesis, make sure it is concise and use confident language to write it out. You should summarize your rational, ethical and emotional supporting arguments here. Keep in mind that the opening paragraph should only be a few sentences long in most cases, so keep it concise.

Develop Your Argument

By this point in the argumentative essay example, it's obvious what the point of the essay is, but you have not yet convinced the reader. You need to develop your argument. Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence introducing a claim, which should support your thesis statement. You may have as few as one claim, but it's a good idea to aim for at least three or four supporting arguments.

Argumentative essay prompts are handy for helping you think more deeply about your chosen topic and will allow you to work on creating

Just stating something doesn't make it fact, so you also need to present evidence in favour of your opinion. Your own personal experience does not stand as a reputable source, so look for scientific studies and government resources to help back up your claims. Statistics and specific data can also be helpful as you argue your main point.

Look at the Opposing Viewpoint

In order to truly convince readers of your point of view, the argumentative essay must also look at the opposing views. What do those on the other side of the issue have to say? Acknowledge these views and refute them with facts, quotes, statistics or logic. The more evidence you have, the better your essay will be.

It's not enough to simply disagree with another point of view or opinion. If you really want to get people to see things your way, you need to convince them with evidence and facts. This requires some research and possibly a little creative thinking. If you’ve chosen a good topic, however, it will be obvious what the opposite view is.

Most argumentative essay prompts will have you cover opposing views in the second or third body paragraph, but it can be used as the intro to the body, as well, with your point at the end. Include every source in your reference section so the reader can double check the evidence for themselves.

Create a Conclusion

Finally, every argumentative essay example finishes with a conclusion. Yours will do the same. Restate your main points and cover the basics of the supporting evidence once more. This is essentially a summary of your entire argument. How has the argument evolved throughout the paper? Give the reader a brief look back over everything.

Before you sign off on your essay, restate your topic and stress the importance of your opinion. Keep this part to one or two paragraphs at the most, since it is simply a recap of the previous points.

If you have done your job and written a convincing argumentative essay, your reader will now either be completely on your side or thinking seriously about their views on your topic. This is the end goal, to shake up those beliefs and help others see your point of view. Doing this in a calm, professional manner will work far better than being too passionate. Use lots of examples and reputable sources to give solid evidence for your side of things and you’ll see good results.

Polish and Revise

Once your essay has been written, it's time to polish it. Go back over the whole essay and look for any spelling or grammatical errors. You should also keep an eye out for pieces that can be better written or tightened up to make better sense.

Now, it's up to the reader to make up their mind. If you've done a good job, they will see things your way and your essay will be a success.

Using a template for your argumentative essay can also help you work through the essay faster and ensures you'll meet common core standards and improve your essay writing skills. Choose a great topic, use prompts and a template and you’ll have a winning argumentative essay by the end.

Argumentative essay is defined as a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate the given topic, collect information, generate and evaluate evidence, in a bid to establish a position on the subject in a concise fashion. It’s the type of work where you have to develop an argument based on evidence and elaborate the stand you take. You may love or loathe writing these essays, but you can’t avoid them. There’ll come the time when you are supposed to write a high-quality argumentative essay to show your understanding of some particular essay topic, but you shouldn’t feel nervous. Successful completion of the essay depends on your ability to create the essay outline correctly. Not sure how to do it? Don’t despair; this post will show you how easy it can be!

Structuring the argumentative essay outline

Although it might seem complicated to you now, once you learn how to structure the argumentative essay outline correctly, it’ll become easier. Your work is comprised of different parts with equally important value. These parts or sections have a role in presenting the topic, developing the argument, presenting evidence, and so on. That said, main parts of the argumentative essay are:

If you think this structure is vague, don’t worry. Every section is thoroughly explained below.

Section 1: Introduction

Just like in any other form of writing, the introduction is where you create the foundation or a basis to build the rest of your work upon. If the intro isn’t structured very well, then the rest of the essay will suffer too. An argumentative essay should start with an introduction comprised of the hook, background info, and thesis.

Hook

The hook is the first sentence (or two) of your work, and its primary purpose is to catch the reader’s attention, hence the name. When a professor, client, or some other person starts reading the essay, its beginning determines whether they’ll continue reading it or not. Let’s say you’re about to read something, would you continue reading that piece if the beginning were dull and boring? The answer would be no. Hooks aren’t limited to essays only; they are present in all types of writing, which is why you’re highly likely to click on links with the catchy sentence under the headline.

Here are a few tips you can use to form the hook:

  • Use a quote from famous people, scientists, writers, artists, etc.
  • Anecdote can also be a good way of grabbing someone’s attention
  • Pose a question
  • Set a scene that reader can relate to Include an interesting fact or definition
  • Reveal a common misconception

Background information

After creating the hook, you proceed to provide some useful background information about the subject. To make things easier for you, this part of the introduction should answer these questions:

  • What is the issue you’re going to discuss?
  • Who cares about the topic?
  • Where is the subject or issue prevalent?
  • Why is the subject or some issue you’re about to discuss importantly?

Example:

Thesis

The thesis statement is the last sentence (or two) that contains the focus of your essay and informs the reader what the essay is going to be about. Your thesis is more than a general statement about the idea or issue that you’re going to elaborate in the essay; it has to establish a clear position you are going to take throughout your argument on a given topic.

Example:

Since this is the last part of the introduction and your opportunity to introduce the reader to the subject and your position, you have to ensure it is structured correctly. Your thesis should be:

  • Unified
  • Concise
  • Specific
  • Clear, easily recognizable

The thesis should match the requirements and goals of the assignment, but you have to be careful and avoid making some common mistakes. For example:

  • Thesis is not a title
  • It is not a statement of the absolute fact
  • Thesis is not an announcement of the subject
  • It’s not the whole essay, but the main idea you’ll discuss

Section 2: Developing the argument

Now that your introduction is well-crafted you’re about to proceeding to the second part of the argumentative essay. In this section, you have to develop the argument using claims and evidence to support them.

Claim

When structuring the argumentative essay outline, you should pay special attention to claims. A claim is the central argument of an essay, and it poses as one of the most important parts of academic papers. In fact, the effectiveness, complexity, and the overall quality of the paper depend on the claims you make. The primary purpose of claim in essay writing is to define paper’s goals, direction, scope, and support the argument. Making claims is easy, but the question is: who’s going to believe in them? That’s why the second section of the argumentative essay is invalid without the evidence.

Evidence

Every claim you make throughout the essay has to be supported by evidence. You have to prove to the reader that claims you make are valid and accurate, the only way to do so is to incorporate reliable, trustworthy evidence based on facts, studies, statistics, and so on. It’s important to bear in mind that evidence is not anecdote or personal knowledge you just happen to possess on a given subject. The evidence is the result of a thorough research on the topic. Once you create the essay outline, you’ll get the idea of claims you’re going to make, then start researching to find enough evidence to support them. Research is one of the most crucial aspects of essay writing, besides giving you material to support your claims it also aims to help you debunk opponents’ arguments.

Section 3: Debunking opponents’ arguments

What most people forget about argumentative essay writing is that you can’t spend the entire time talking about your arguments and piling on evidence one after another. The argumentative essay isn’t about proving you’re right in many different ways. Where’s the argument in that? After making your claims, elaborating them with evidence, you are ready to move on to the third section of the outline where you’ll name the opposing arguments and debunk them.

Regardless of the topic, you have (or choose) and the stand you take, there’s always the opposite side. State the opponents’ views and use the evidence, reliable sources to debunk or refute them. Just like with the previous section, for every opposing argument, you also have to elaborate why it’s wrong and support it with evidence. This way, your reader is more convinced that claims you made are, indeed, correct. The importance of this section is in the fact it shows two sides of the coin while still giving you the opportunity to elaborate why you’re right. Plus, it is considered unethical to exclude arguments that aren’t supportive of the thesis or claims you made.

Instead of using “he said, she said” writing in this section when naming opposing views, you should do it in the formal fashion, with references, reliable sources, and other relevant info, before proceeding to refute them.

Section 4: Conclusion At this point, your essay is almost over.

The introduction is well-structured, you’ve elaborated your claims with evidence as well as opponents’ arguments (with proof of course), and you’re ready to conclude the essay. Unfortunately, the power of well-written conclusion is underestimated in essay writing, but the wrong conclusion can ruin your entire work. This is something you don’t want to happen, right? Your conclusion should be comprised of three different parts:

  • Restates the primary premise/argument
  • Presents one or two general sentences which accurately summarize your argument or stated premise
  • Provides a general warning of the consequences that could happen if the argument or premise isn’t followed or reporting potential benefits to the society or community if your argument or solution proposed is implemented

The conclusion should be about the same length of the introduction; it works best when it’s short, concise, and precise. Avoid wordiness or discussing the same issue again because the reader might assume your work is repetitive. Stick to the point, and you’ll have a strong conclusion that only adds to the overall quality of your essay.

An example of the argumentative essay:

Now that you know how to create the argumentative essay outline correctly, you’re ready to start working on your assignment. The diagram below explains all constituents of this type of work in a simple fashion.

Tips for writing argumentative essay

Here are some tips that will make the essay writing process easier:

  • Make sure you understand the title before creating the outline
  • Create a plan Research
  • Don’t make up information, statistics or other data just to prove the point Include every source you use in the reference section
  • Be concise
  • Avoid writing complex sentences
  • Read, edit, and submit

Bottom line

Argumentative essay isn’t as complicated to write as it sounds, all you have to do is to follow the simple outline provided above. The primary idea behind this kind of essay writing is presenting and developing an argument using solid evidence to back up your point of view. It’s a marvelous opportunity to show the vast knowledge about the subject and demonstrate writing skills. You don’t have to wait for the assignment, choose the topic you care about and start practicing.

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